Most car insurance providers will offer to include your RV as part of your auto insurance policy, as such you will get traditional car insurance coverage. This will include bodily injury and property damage liability coverage, personal injury protection, collision, comprehensive, medical payments, and uninsured or underinsured motorist coverage, which essentially protects you against accidents and physical damage while on the road. (For a more detailed explanation of coverage see below.)  

Usually, when people think of RVs, the first thing that comes to mind are the typical campervans packed with small appliances and elevated roofs, or the spacious and luxurious Class A motorhomes that cruise America’s Interstate Highways. While these are amongst the most popular RV models, RVs come in many shapes and sizes, and some are even designed just to store belongings, with no sleeping quarters or mini fridges in sight. However, RVs oftentimes include amenities such as cooking equipment and storage space. They can be self-motorized or towed behind a vehicle.

The main difference between collision and comprehensive coverage comes down to the question of what the driver controls. Collision insurance will cover events within a motorist's control or when another vehicle collides with your car. Comprehensive coverage generally falls under "acts of God or nature," or things that are typically out of your control when driving. These can include events such as a spooked deer, a heavy hailstorm, or a carjacking.
A prescription plan is another important consideration. If you need to take medications regularly you'll want to choose a plan with a good prescription plan. If you need to insure your entire family, you'll want to look at family deductibles and maximums. Only full-coverage options will satisfy the minimal essential health care insurance required to get around paying the fine.
An insurance provider and you might not consider your RV to be worth the same. By settling on an agreed value with your potential RV insurance provider, you are ensuring that both you and your insurance company have the same value of your RV in mind if you face a worst-case scenario—the total loss of your RV. It’s also important to ask about the next lower threshold for an agreed value premium. By agreeing to a slightly lower level of coverage, you might be able to save plenty on your premiums.

It might be the most difficult thing you’ll ever do, but it’s important to advocate for yourself during an emergency room visit. If possible, ask all the questions you can think of and make sure to get answers before agreeing to have any procedures done. And just because you’re at an in-network facility doesn’t mean you’ll always be treated by an in-network doctor, so make sure to talk to whoever is providing the care if you can. Obviously this isn’t possible if you’re incapacitated, but if you can, you should make clear what your health insurance does and does not cover. This can help you avoid an unexpectedly large bill later. If you do end up with a huge emergency room bill even though you have insurance, contact your provider and ask if there are any programs available for bill reduction.


Both part-timers and full-timers can find coverage geared towards their type of RVing. Part-timers can opt for Progressive’s vacation liability coverage, which offers up to $10,000, with an upgrade of up to $500,000 if someone is hurt in or around their RV while they are on vacation, and emergency expense coverage, which provides $750 for transportation and hotel costs plus meals, again, if they are on vacation. Full-timers can enhance their coverage with Progressive’s full timer’s personal liability, replacement cost of personal effects, and total loss coverages.
Additional living expenses, or loss-of-use coverage is typically a fixed amount – 20% of your dwelling coverage. However, if you live in an area prone to wildfires or hurricanes, it's worth checking with your insurer to see if they offer higher coverage limits in the event a catastrophe forces you from your home for an extended period. Additional living expenses can add up, so it may be worth the added peace of mind to increase this coverage component.
Insurance terms, definitions and explanations are intended for informational purposes only and do not in any way replace or modify the definitions and information contained in individual insurance contracts, policies or declaration pages, which are controlling. Such terms and availability may vary by state and exclusions may apply. Discounts may not be applied to all policy coverages.

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To build the car insurance ranking, we surveyed 2,799 consumers who filed a car insurance claim in the last five years. Respondents provided this data based on their experience with their car insurance company, answering questions about their satisfaction with the ease of filing a claim, customer service, claim status communication, claim resolution, overall value they feel their insurance company gives, if they’d recommend the company, and if they planned to renew their policy.
Individual and family health insurance plans can help cover expenses in the case of serious medical emergencies, and help you and your family stay on top of preventative health-care services. Having health insurance coverage can save you money on doctor's visits, prescriptions drugs, preventative care and other health-care services. Typical health insurance plans for individuals include costs such as a monthly premium, annual deductible, copayments, and coinsurance.
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