Most car insurance providers will offer to include your RV as part of your auto insurance policy, as such you will get traditional car insurance coverage. This will include bodily injury and property damage liability coverage, personal injury protection, collision, comprehensive, medical payments, and uninsured or underinsured motorist coverage, which essentially protects you against accidents and physical damage while on the road. (For a more detailed explanation of coverage see below.)  
There is a case to be made for getting just comprehensive and not collision insurance, even if your car is not valuable. Comprehensive covers you for a lot more perils than does collision--including, most importantly, against theft. Regardless of the value of your car, having it stolen is a major inconvenience. Even if your car is worth only $2,000 at the time of the theft, and your insurer gives you $1,500, that sum would go a long way in buying yourself a new vehicle. As we discuss in more detail below, comprehensive insurance generally costs no more than $200 per year, so a $1,500 reimbursement would make the coverage valuable.
Insurers don't determine your actual cash value (ACV) settlement based on what you owe, but rather on what the car is worth just prior to the accident. Let's say you owe $20,000 on your new car, but it's only worth about $16,000. If your car is totaled, you might get a settlement check of $16,000 but still owe an additional $4,000 on your loan or lease.
The best companies will also have several supplemental coverage options, or endorsements, that you can add to your homeowners policy. Endorsements can vary, as some provide higher coverage limits for certain types of personal property like jewelry or fine furs; or they can provide supplemental coverage for risks — like water backups, floods, or earthquakes — not covered by home insurance.
By law, any type of registered vehicle must be insured. Motorhomes, like cars, are required to at least have liability insurance. Travel trailers and other towable RVs, on the other hand, cannot be driven and therefore aren’t required to have insurance. Keep in mind that towable RVs, although not vehicles, are still susceptible to theft, damage from natural disasters, vandalism, and collision, so it is highly recommended for them to still have coverage.
Even if you consider yourself healthy, it’s important to see a doctor on occasion for a checkup. U.S. News and World Report says if you can't remember the last time you went, it has definitely been too long. You should also go for a checkup if anything has changed since the last time you saw a doctor. Are you coughing more than usual? Is that mole bigger? Even minor things can reflect larger underlying health problems. The earlier you catch any health problem, the better. An annual checkup can help with that. There are also age-related milestone checkups you shouldn't skip like an annual mammogram for women starting at age 40 or a colon cancer screening starting at age 50. These are some of the many reasons it’s important to have health insurance, as many plans cover preventative health screening services. Depending on the company and the checkup, you might not have to pay anything out of pocket.
A prescription plan is another important consideration. If you need to take medications regularly you'll want to choose a plan with a good prescription plan. If you need to insure your entire family, you'll want to look at family deductibles and maximums. Only full-coverage options will satisfy the minimal essential health care insurance required to get around paying the fine.
How much car insurance you need depends on how much coverage you are legally obligated to get, as well as how much coverage you need for your situation. Each state has certain legal requirements for car insurance, and not meeting them can result in negative consequences. Check out our car insurance state guides to see the legal car insurance minimums in your state.
Vox published an analysis of more than 1,100 emergency room bills in December 2018 that found emergency rooms often charge a lot for items you could buy at a drugstore such as bandages and low-grade pain medication. If you’re at the doctor for something relatively minor, consider asking if you’ll be charged for these supplies, and if so, turn them down. You can always stop at the store on the way home and get them for far less money. Whatever private health insurance you have, it’s important to know your benefits well.
According to Greg Gerber, “Most car insurance firms don’t have a clue of what can go wrong with an RV and don’t provide the coverage to get it fixed adequately,” which is why he advises consumers to get a separate policy for their RVs instead of bundling, to “avoid the hassle that can come if the RV itself is broken and they’re trying to get their car insurance company to fix it.” 
Non-owner car insurance is just what it sounds like. It’s insurance that covers the driver instead of the car. That is, if you don’t own a car, but frequently drive a friend’s car, rental cars, work cars, or use a car-sharing service, non-owner insurance covers your liability in the event of an accident. It can cover your liability for medical costs and property damage. In some states, non-owner car insurance can also help you regain your license after it’s been suspended. It can also lower car insurance rates if you buy a car later since there won’t be an uninsured period on your record. |
Insurers don't determine your actual cash value (ACV) settlement based on what you owe, but rather on what the car is worth just prior to the accident. Let's say you owe $20,000 on your new car, but it's only worth about $16,000. If your car is totaled, you might get a settlement check of $16,000 but still owe an additional $4,000 on your loan or lease.
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