In the 2018 midterm elections, ballot measures passed in both Missouri and Utah legalizing the use of medical marijuana. This means that in total, 32 states and Washington D.C. now allow for the medicinal use of cannabis. So can you use your health insurance to help pay for it? Due to the U.S. government's classification of the plant as a Schedule I drug, you can't use Medicare to pay for medical marijuana because it technically doesn't have any accepted medical use. Private insurers won’t cover it either, partially because the Food and Drug Administration hasn’t approved it for use. If you’re outside of the U.S. you’ll have more luck. With the legalization of recreational marijuana use in Canada in 2018, Sun Life Financial is now offering plans that cover medical marijuana use.
Let's use the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy as an example to illustrate the differences between collision and comprehensive. Within that storm, let's consider two events that might have happened: 1) a heavy tree branch fell on your car, or 2) you swerved to avoid a falling tree branch and wound up crashing into a tree. In the first event, you had no control over when or why a tree branch would fall on your car. This kind of accident would get reimbursed under your comprehensive policy. In the second situation, you were driving the car and ultimately swerved into the tree, which makes it a collision, and collision insurance therefore pays for the damages. Events like the hypothetical ones stated above are why it's important to differentiate between the two types of coverage.
While there are a couple of benefits of collision insurance, the main one is that you can file a claim and receive reimbursement regardless of who was at fault. Collision claims usually get processed faster than property damage claims because the insurance company does not have to spend time investigating who was at-fault. Another benefit is that you only deal with your own insurance company, rather than another insurer with less incentive to pay for your claim. Collision insurance can also be used toward your rental car in most cases, which can spare you from having to buy rental car insurance.
Gap insurance is insurance that may be required if you lease or finance a car. Gap insurance covers the difference between what your car is worth and what you owe on your auto loan should your car be a total loss in an incident. For example, let’s say you have a car loan with a balance of $20,000, but your car is only worth $15,000. If it’s totaled in an accident, your insurance will only pay out $15,000 and you will owe $5,000 to settle your loan. If you have gap insurance, that policy will pay the $5,000 to settle your loan balance.
This coverage reimburses you for the cost of your rental car if your insured vehicle is in the shop or is unavailable due to an accident. You need to have comprehensive and collision on your policy in order to add rental car coverage. In certain states, Esurance offers CarMatch Rental Coverage®, which covers the rental cost of a vehicle comparable in size and body type to your regular ride.
Fifth-wheel trailers offer similar accommodations and amenities to those of Class A or Class C motorhomes, but are towed behind a vehicle, so you don’t have to take them everywhere you go. Toy haulers are basically mobile garages, they can be used to store things like cars, motorcycles, and snowmobiles. Horse trailers, just as the name suggests, are towable trailers used to carry horses or other animals. Cargo or utility trailers are towable metal boxes that are strictly used to store your belongings.
Further examples are the company’s storage option and low mileage discount—both great solutions for part-time RVers. Baby Boomers are more likely to own a home and those that were born between 1946 and 1964 are now heading into retirement. This makes them more prone to RV part-time rather than full-time when compared to Millennials, for example. Some Baby Boomers end up making their RVs a home-on-wheels, but many are also likely to take their RV out for vacation with their families, or to explore the great outdoors for certain seasons or periods of time.
When judging coverage and benefits, we singled out RV insurance carriers that offered extensive and flexible coverage options. To be considered for our list, companies had to provide all the traditional insurance protection, as well as a healthy amount of RV-specific options. Most RV insurers offer liability, personal injury protection (PIP), collision, underinsured or uninsured motorist, and comprehensive coverage. Other types, such as full-timer and Mexico coverage, vary in availability from company to company.
According to Greg Gerber, “Most car insurance firms don’t have a clue of what can go wrong with an RV and don’t provide the coverage to get it fixed adequately,” which is why he advises consumers to get a separate policy for their RVs instead of bundling, to “avoid the hassle that can come if the RV itself is broken and they’re trying to get their car insurance company to fix it.” 
This longstanding insurance company has a lot of options, so there's sure to be a comprehensive plan that meets your needs. Blue Cross Blue Shield is a nationwide provider made up of local independently operated companies. This means the coverage is broad but can vary depending on where you live. There are more plans compared to other insurance providers we evaluated. In fact, we were given a choice of about 20 plans during testing. There is a side-by-side comparison feature that outlines specific costs and benefits with a pop-up window that shows you even more information about each. 
National General Insurance has been around for a long time—for over 95 years, in fact. It is the only auto insurance company to have originated within the auto manufacturing industry. With nearly a century of experience insuring vehicles, and more than 25 years insuring RVs, Baby Boomers are more likely to appreciate the level of expertise and reliability that National General brings to the table.
Individual and family health insurance plans can help cover expenses in the case of serious medical emergencies, and help you and your family stay on top of preventative health-care services. Having health insurance coverage can save you money on doctor's visits, prescriptions drugs, preventative care and other health-care services. Typical health insurance plans for individuals include costs such as a monthly premium, annual deductible, copayments, and coinsurance.
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