Comprehensive car insurance covers damage to your car if it collides with something other than another car, like an animal or a tree, or if it’s damaged by vandalism, theft, or natural disaster. Again, if you lease your car or have an outstanding loan on it, this type of coverage will be required, but if you pay your car off, or it becomes worth less money than it would cost to repair, you can decline this coverage.
Non-owner car insurance is just what it sounds like. It’s insurance that covers the driver instead of the car. That is, if you don’t own a car, but frequently drive a friend’s car, rental cars, work cars, or use a car-sharing service, non-owner insurance covers your liability in the event of an accident. It can cover your liability for medical costs and property damage. In some states, non-owner car insurance can also help you regain your license after it’s been suspended. It can also lower car insurance rates if you buy a car later since there won’t be an uninsured period on your record. |
Let's use the aftermath of a major storm to illustrate the differences between collision and comprehensive. Within that storm, let's consider two hypothetical events: First, a heavy telephone pole was blown down and fell on your truck, or second, you swerved to avoid a falling tree and wound up crashing into a guardrail. In the first event, you couldn't control when or why a tree fell on your car. This kind of accident would get reimbursed under your comprehensive policy. In the second situation, you were driving the car and ultimately swerved into the guardrail. This makes it a collision, and collision insurance pays for the damages.
Getting a quote isn't as simple as with other insurance companies, and when we used it, the side-by-side comparison tool sometimes failed, but that doesn't mean everyone will have the same experience. There is a FAQ page, and Aetna is also very active on social media if you're trying to get a fast response to a question. Affordable Care Act-approved plans are available, and you can even get supplemental insurance if the insurance you get through your job doesn't cover the things you need. While this provider isn’t perfect, it’s an affordable option for most people.

Jonathan and Ashley Longnecker, full-time RVers and bloggers of TinyShinyHome.com, sold their new and oversized 5th-wheel trailer for a much smaller, compact vintage Airstream. Although a family of six, their original RV was very heavy, long, and tall, which made it more difficult to travel long distances without worrying about parking, turning, and hitting low overpasses. The family decided they’d sacrifice the extra space in order to travel lighter and with greater peace of mind. 
A quick look at the company’s page on the Better Business Bureau shows just how satisfied consumers are with its customer service. Most insurance companies display a large amount of negative feedback online—it comes with the territory—National General, however, enjoys largely positive customer reviews and averages fewer complaints than many of its competitors. Baby Boomers highly value good customer service, and this level of satisfaction with National General can also be seen on other online review outlets.

Another good way to get the cheapest auto insurance rates is to use as many car insurance discounts as you can. Car insurance companies offer many discounts, including good student discounts, paperless billing discounts, discounts for multiple policies, and discounts for going a certain period of time without making a claim. Some also offer discounts for things like having a tracker in your car. Read more about the car insurance discounts that can help you get the cheapest car insurance.

Both part-timers and full-timers can find coverage geared towards their type of RVing. Part-timers can opt for Progressive’s vacation liability coverage, which offers up to $10,000, with an upgrade of up to $500,000 if someone is hurt in or around their RV while they are on vacation, and emergency expense coverage, which provides $750 for transportation and hotel costs plus meals, again, if they are on vacation. Full-timers can enhance their coverage with Progressive’s full timer’s personal liability, replacement cost of personal effects, and total loss coverages.


If you decide to opt out instead of acquiring compliant health insurance, you do have a few options. These options probably won't qualify to relieve you of having to pay the shared responsibility payment, but they can still lower your health care costs. Many insurance companies offer short-term insurance plans that might help you between coverage periods or after losing insurance. Catastrophic insurance usually has a high deductible, but can help if you need expensive treatment. Another option is Direct Primary Care (DPC) or "concierge medicine." These are not standard insurance models but involve a direct payment to the provider as an annual fee or retainer for services. This type of arrangement is not common, but it's an option for some. Boutique offices are becoming increasingly popular as well. These medical practices do not bother with insurance and simply make cash-price arrangements with patients. Many offer quite competitive rates for routine services. However, keep in mind that this alternative option does not satisfy the requirement to have minimal compliant health insurance and that you may need to pay the fine unless you are somehow otherwise exempt.

Policies typically use vague language when referring to acts of terrorism, but they are generally insured by the comprehensive portion of your policy. For example, if there is an act of terror and you need to make a claim on your car, that can only be made if you have comprehensive coverage. Since some circumstances are out of our control, comprehensive insurance is certainly important to have in your policy.
Admittedly, we originally approached this topic with the traditional opinion that RVs were mainly of interest to retirees, the baby boomers who enjoy spending their post-work life experiencing the great outdoors. While this segment of the population has long been the backbone of the RV industry, the new trend of working remotely while traveling is attracting much younger consumers to the RV lifestyle.

You can also save on car insurance by choosing the lowest amount of coverage you can get while still making sure that you’re meeting your state’s legal requirements for insurance and giving yourself the coverage you need if you’re in an accident. For example, let’s say you choose to get the legal minimum for liability coverage, which we’ll say is $30,000 for this example. If you are at fault for an accident that hurts someone, resulting in $100,000 in medical costs for them, you will be on the hook for the $70,000 difference between your insurance coverage and the harm you caused. You can be sued and lose assets, like your home or retirement savings, if this happens – so make sure you have enough insurance to keep your assets in the event of an accident where you are at fault.
According to the Insurance Information Institute’s table of Automobile Financial Responsibility Laws by State, 49 out of all 50 states, as well as the District of Columbia, require you to have some sort of liability coverage for all vehicles on the road, including RVs. The only exception to this rule is the state of New Hampshire, which has no mandatory insurance law, and only requires financial responsibility from the person at fault in a car accident.
Further examples are the company’s storage option and low mileage discount—both great solutions for part-time RVers. Baby Boomers are more likely to own a home and those that were born between 1946 and 1964 are now heading into retirement. This makes them more prone to RV part-time rather than full-time when compared to Millennials, for example. Some Baby Boomers end up making their RVs a home-on-wheels, but many are also likely to take their RV out for vacation with their families, or to explore the great outdoors for certain seasons or periods of time.

Health insurance is now available to more Americans than ever before. Subsidized options are easily available to low-income individuals and families. In the past, many people took the risk of not being insured, but with the Affordable Care Act (ACA) you can be fined if you don't have qualified health care insurance. Instead of paying a fine, people who have not been able to afford insurance before are looking for affordable medical insurance options.


Progressive Home Advantage® policies are placed through Progressive Advantage Agency, Inc. with affiliated and third-party insurers who are solely responsible for claims, and pay PAA commission for policies sold. Prices, coverages, privacy policies, and PAA's commission vary among these insurers. How you buy (phone, online, mobile, or independent agent/broker) determines which insurers are available to you. Click here for a list of the insurers or contact us for more information about PAA's commission. Discounts not available in all states and situations.
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