This wrebsite provides general information for educational purposes only and is not intended to be legal advice. We make no guarantees as to the validity of the information presented. Your particular facts and circumstances, and changes in the law, must be considered when applying insurance law. You should always consult with a competent auto insurance professional licensed in your state with respect to your particular situation.
Bus-conversion homes are a popular and fast-growing trend within the RV lifestyle. City buses, Greyhounds, and even school buses are highly sought after and, once renovated, become non-traditional RVs that fall into the Class A category. While bus renovation projects are becoming mainstream, they can be difficult to insure. Buses, especially school bus-converted homes or “Skoolies,” are considered more of a risk due to their weight and balance limitations. Vehicles originally built for mass transportation do not have the same axle and weight distribution as traditional RVs, which are designed for sleeping and carrying additional living necessities.
A quick look at the company’s page on the Better Business Bureau shows just how satisfied consumers are with its customer service. Most insurance companies display a large amount of negative feedback online—it comes with the territory—National General, however, enjoys largely positive customer reviews and averages fewer complaints than many of its competitors. Baby Boomers highly value good customer service, and this level of satisfaction with National General can also be seen on other online review outlets.
Whether you are a Millennial or a Baby Boomer, if you have never traversed the tricky field of buying insurance for an RV, your best option is most likely going to be a reliable marketplace that can both inform and point users in the right direction. RVInsurance.com is just that kind of marketplace, featuring a wealth of helpful information pertaining to purchasing an RV, insuring it, and staying safe on the road.

In a best-case scenario, you’ll never have to use your car insurance. After all, making a claim on your auto insurance means you’ve suffered some sort of loss, and no one wants that. However, going through life without ever having a fender bender or other damage to your car is unlikely. In some cases, you’ll be making a car insurance claim after a harrowing experience, like a serious accident. After going through something like that, you want to be sure your insurance company isn’t going to make things worse.


Bus-conversion homes are a popular and fast-growing trend within the RV lifestyle. City buses, Greyhounds, and even school buses are highly sought after and, once renovated, become non-traditional RVs that fall into the Class A category. While bus renovation projects are becoming mainstream, they can be difficult to insure. Buses, especially school bus-converted homes or “Skoolies,” are considered more of a risk due to their weight and balance limitations. Vehicles originally built for mass transportation do not have the same axle and weight distribution as traditional RVs, which are designed for sleeping and carrying additional living necessities.
This longstanding insurance company has a lot of options, so there's sure to be a comprehensive plan that meets your needs. Blue Cross Blue Shield is a nationwide provider made up of local independently operated companies. This means the coverage is broad but can vary depending on where you live. There are more plans compared to other insurance providers we evaluated. In fact, we were given a choice of about 20 plans during testing. There is a side-by-side comparison feature that outlines specific costs and benefits with a pop-up window that shows you even more information about each. 
Many baby boomers are doing the same: spending their retirement visiting national parks, historic landmarks, and exploring the country. Empty nesters and the 55+ crowd find that RV living offers both freedom and a strong sense of community. Contrary to the popular belief that RVers are constantly on the move, RV and manufactured home parks also serve as seasonal homes, with plenty of things to do to keep an active lifestyle.

While not all large insurance companies are the same, some of them might be selling insurance policies for vehicles that they do not have much experience covering. RV insurance in particular is offered by many auto insurance companies who may not be well prepared for handling the intricacies of an RV insurance claim. When choosing who is going to insure your vehicle, make sure it is a provider who specializes in RV insurance—regardless of its size—or that at least has a good track record of dealing with RV insurance policies and claims.
Still, regardless of whether your state requires you to have an RV insurance policy, it’s always best to have one if you plan on living in your RV full-time to protect yourself and your vehicle against any damages and covered losses. On the other hand, if you plan on using your RV seasonally or for short trips, then liability coverage might be enough.
Insurers don't determine your actual cash value (ACV) settlement based on what you owe, but rather on what the car is worth just prior to the accident. Let's say you owe $20,000 on your new car, but it's only worth about $16,000. If your car is totaled, you might get a settlement check of $16,000 but still owe an additional $4,000 on your loan or lease.
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