Collision insurance is a coverage that helps pay to repair or replace your car if it's damaged in an accident with another vehicle or object, such as a fence or a tree. If you're leasing or financing your car, collision coverage is typically required by the lender. If your car is paid off, collision is an optional coverage on your car insurance policy.

The minimum liability requirements vary from state to state, with most requiring only $50,000 in bodily injury coverage and $25,000 in property damage. However, to make sure you’re fully covered in case of an accident, we recommend policies that provide much more than the minimum. With this in mind, providers that featured a greater selection of coverage options with higher liability limits across the board ranked higher with us.
While some may be asking themselves if it would it be cheaper to just pay the fine, statistics show that more Americans have health insurance now than before the ACA was enacted. There are several reasons why more people have insurance now, but one is certainly the increase in affordable health plan options, including subsidized, or tax credits, health insurance purchased through one of the state exchanges. Compliant insurance can also be purchased privately. The options available to you depend primarily on your income level.
Even if you consider yourself healthy, it’s important to see a doctor on occasion for a checkup. U.S. News and World Report says if you can't remember the last time you went, it has definitely been too long. You should also go for a checkup if anything has changed since the last time you saw a doctor. Are you coughing more than usual? Is that mole bigger? Even minor things can reflect larger underlying health problems. The earlier you catch any health problem, the better. An annual checkup can help with that. There are also age-related milestone checkups you shouldn't skip like an annual mammogram for women starting at age 40 or a colon cancer screening starting at age 50. These are some of the many reasons it’s important to have health insurance, as many plans cover preventative health screening services. Depending on the company and the checkup, you might not have to pay anything out of pocket.

If you’re drawn to the minimalist and tiny home movement, or simply enjoy traveling for a living, you’re probably interested in buying an RV. Travel trailers are still the most popular and common RVs, with many families opting for the larger, bus-sized motorhomes. Whichever you decide, it’s beneficial to analyze your family’s individual needs and weigh the pros and cons. 
Further examples are the company’s storage option and low mileage discount—both great solutions for part-time RVers. Baby Boomers are more likely to own a home and those that were born between 1946 and 1964 are now heading into retirement. This makes them more prone to RV part-time rather than full-time when compared to Millennials, for example. Some Baby Boomers end up making their RVs a home-on-wheels, but many are also likely to take their RV out for vacation with their families, or to explore the great outdoors for certain seasons or periods of time.
Personal injury or bodily injury protection, which is often a part of full coverage car insurance, covers medical costs for you, your passengers, or other people injured in an accident. This type of coverage is required by most states, but keep in mind that the legal requirement may be too low for real world application. As medical costs soar, a policy that only pays out $30,000 is not likely to be enough, and you will be responsible for any difference between what your policy pays and what the actual medical costs are. It’s tempting to skimp on this coverage, but that can be a costly mistake.
Admittedly, we originally approached this topic with the traditional opinion that RVs were mainly of interest to retirees, the baby boomers who enjoy spending their post-work life experiencing the great outdoors. While this segment of the population has long been the backbone of the RV industry, the new trend of working remotely while traveling is attracting much younger consumers to the RV lifestyle.
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The cost of insurance is on the rise: the price for auto insurance rose 3.6% between 2011 and 2012, and 3.1% for homeowners and renter’s insurance, according to the Insurance Information Institute. In fact, auto liability insurance premiums alone have been increasing by 2.8% annually for the past three years. This makes choosing the right coverage and provider all the more crucial to save money without sacrificing important aspects of coverage.
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