Family Profile: This policy was for a 50-year-old couple with two children, ages 20 and 18, who have had good driving records for the previous three years. They drive a 2012 Toyota Camry and a 2007 Toyota Corolla for a combined 20,000 miles per year. They carry a basic liability coverage of $25,000 / $50,000 for bodily injury, and $50,000 for property damage.
Family Profile: This policy was for a 50-year-old couple with two children, ages 20 and 18, who have had good driving records for the previous three years. They drive a 2012 Toyota Camry and a 2007 Toyota Corolla for a combined 20,000 miles per year. They carry a basic liability coverage of $25,000 / $50,000 for bodily injury, and $50,000 for property damage.
In a best-case scenario, you’ll never have to use your car insurance. After all, making a claim on your auto insurance means you’ve suffered some sort of loss, and no one wants that. However, going through life without ever having a fender bender or other damage to your car is unlikely. In some cases, you’ll be making a car insurance claim after a harrowing experience, like a serious accident. After going through something like that, you want to be sure your insurance company isn’t going to make things worse.
Though you may meet the state's minimum requirement, we recommend that you consider opting in for a higher level of coverage. If you are in a particularly expensive accident, your minimum coverage may not be enough to fully cover the damages and you may have to pay out-of-pocket. This applies whether you're a college student at the University of Central Florida, a new family starting out in Tallahassee or you are a retiree in the Sunshine State.

Cash in on major life changes. Certain life events could translate to cheaper car insurance, so shop for quotes whenever something major changes in your life. For instance, many companies offer a lower rate for married couples or domestic partners. Or perhaps you moved to a suburb with lower accident and crime rates. If your risk for accidents goes down, your rates just might, too.
According to the Insurance Information Institute’s table of Automobile Financial Responsibility Laws by State, 49 out of all 50 states, as well as the District of Columbia, require you to have some sort of liability coverage for all vehicles on the road, including RVs. The only exception to this rule is the state of New Hampshire, which has no mandatory insurance law, and only requires financial responsibility from the person at fault in a car accident.
Companies also needed to offer full-timer coverage for those who live year-round in their RV; full replacement coverage in the event the RV is totaled or stolen; personal belonging coverage for the property inside the RV, including electronics, appliances, and jewelry; vacation liability coverage for injuries that occur at the vacation site where the RV is parked; and permanently attached items coverage for items like satellite dishes, wheelchair lifts, or retractable canopies. Finally, companies also were required to cover most, if not all types of recreational vehicles.
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