The coverage options that Good Sam’s Full Time RV Insurance provides include but are not limited to: personal liability, which is similar to vacation liability and pays for injuries that happen around the RV or on the customer’s property; medical payments to others, which covers the costs of medical expenses incurred by those who are injured while visiting the RV and/or the property around it; personal belongings coverage, which provides up to $3,000 of full replacement cost coverage at no extra cost; and an emergency expense allowance, which covers the costs of food and lodging if the customer is ever involved in a covered claim more than 100 miles from their home.

RVInsurance.com is partnered with twenty carriers known in the industry for their strong and consistent financial performance. Nationwide, the Foremost Insurance Group, National General, and Safeco Insurance are some of these carriers, to name a few. They share similar A-or-higher ratings with at least one of the large financial strength rating agencies.
Let's use the aftermath of a major storm to illustrate the differences between collision and comprehensive. Within that storm, let's consider two hypothetical events: First, a heavy telephone pole was blown down and fell on your truck, or second, you swerved to avoid a falling tree and wound up crashing into a guardrail. In the first event, you couldn't control when or why a tree fell on your car. This kind of accident would get reimbursed under your comprehensive policy. In the second situation, you were driving the car and ultimately swerved into the guardrail. This makes it a collision, and collision insurance pays for the damages.

Jonathan Longnecker and Greg Gerber both experienced mechanical issues with their brand new RVs, requiring frequent repairs. As a result, both bloggers suggest buying used or vintage RVs and renovating them, learning your machine’s ins and outs during the process. This way, owners can take care of repairs themselves instead of losing travel time waiting for overbooked RV service shops under their insurance policy.


One way to do this is to call the insurance company and see what the hold time is and what the service is like when you wait to speak to a representative about a general inquiry. If the hold time is 3 hours and they don’t seem like an accommodating group, you’re probably not going to want to deal with them after you just lost your house and file a claim.
Companies also needed to offer full-timer coverage for those who live year-round in their RV; full replacement coverage in the event the RV is totaled or stolen; personal belonging coverage for the property inside the RV, including electronics, appliances, and jewelry; vacation liability coverage for injuries that occur at the vacation site where the RV is parked; and permanently attached items coverage for items like satellite dishes, wheelchair lifts, or retractable canopies. Finally, companies also were required to cover most, if not all types of recreational vehicles.
The amount of insurance your RV requires will mainly depend on the type of motorhome or towable you own, how often you use it, and whether you plan to reside in it for six or more months out of the year. There are two types of recreational vehicles, the towable trailer and the motorhome, which falls into three categories: Class A, B or C motorhomes. Class A motorhomes are the largest and tend to be the most expensive. They often include luxury features, customized amenities, and permanent attachments that may require additional protection. Class B vehicles are the smallest type of RV, also known as “camper vans,” and are generally much cheaper to insure than larger motorhomes. Class C vehicles are a hybrid of Class A and B.
Further examples are the company’s storage option and low mileage discount—both great solutions for part-time RVers. Baby Boomers are more likely to own a home and those that were born between 1946 and 1964 are now heading into retirement. This makes them more prone to RV part-time rather than full-time when compared to Millennials, for example. Some Baby Boomers end up making their RVs a home-on-wheels, but many are also likely to take their RV out for vacation with their families, or to explore the great outdoors for certain seasons or periods of time.
Travelers: Travelers is the second-best car insurance company. Travelers' customers report that they appreciate the customer service Travelers provides, and the company gets high marks for how it resolves its customers’ claims. Travelers' lost a few points from customers who didn’t feel like they got good value from the company, and Travelers' average annual rates are a bit higher than average among all companies on this list.
Three other ways to keep payments low further cement Progressive RV Insurance as our choice for Millennials. The first, small accident forgiveness, goes into effect as soon as a policy starts and excuses customers for claims of $500 or less. The second and third are particularly remarkable for the way they encourage long-standing relationships with customers.
Progressive Home Advantage® policies are placed through Progressive Advantage Agency, Inc. with affiliated and third-party insurers who are solely responsible for claims, and pay PAA commission for policies sold. Prices, coverages, privacy policies, and PAA's commission vary among these insurers. How you buy (phone, online, mobile, or independent agent/broker) determines which insurers are available to you. Click here for a list of the insurers or contact us for more information about PAA's commission. Discounts not available in all states and situations.
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